0ne-fit-vegan
Instead of saying “I don’t have time” try saying “it’s not a priority,” and see how that feels. Often, that’s a perfectly adequate explanation. I have time to iron my sheets, I just don’t want to. But other things are harder. Try it: “I’m not going to edit your résumé, sweetie, because it’s not a priority.” “I don’t go to the doctor because my health is not a priority.” If these phrases don’t sit well, that’s the point. Changing our language reminds us that time is a choice. If we don’t like how we’re spending an hour, we can choose differently.
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medresearch
medresearch:

Creative Minds: The Muscle-Brain ConnectionOriginally posted on the NIH Director’s Blog on September 23, 2014 by Dr. Francis Collins
There’s mounting evidence that exercise has a powerful effect on the human brain. For example, many studies have shown that physical activity appears to reduce the incidence of depression. Exercise can also delay or possibly even prevent Alzheimer’s disease, as well as easing symptoms in people who have these disorders [1, 2, 3, 4, 5]. But how, exactly, does getting our legs moving and our hearts pumping exert a positive influence on our brains?
Two scientists at Stanford University School of Medicine are out to get some answers to this important question. They have proposed that when we exercise, our muscles secrete a factor or combination of factors into the bloodstream, leading to structural and functional changes in the brain.
Winners of a 2013 NIH Director’s Transformative Research Award, Tony Wyss-Coray and Thomas Rando plan to collect all of the molecules that muscles secrete that enable them to communicate with other cells. These molecules include hormones, growth factors, and small proteins called cytokines that are important in cell signaling. The Stanford duo suspects that the key to exercise’s beneficial impact on the brain may lie in its effect on this collection of molecules—which they have dubbed “the communicome.”
To study the communicome, Wyss-Coray and Rando will use a technique called parabiosis to couple the circulatory systems of physically active mice with mice that are less active. If the “couch potato” mice benefit from the blood of the active mice, then the team will analyze the blood to find the responsible factor(s).
This is definitely high-risk high-reward research. It won’t be easy, but finding molecules that mimic exercise’s brain-boosting effects may open the door to new ways of preventing or treating age-related cognitive declines and a wide range of other neurological conditions. This is especially important for people for whom it is difficult or even hazardous to exercise because of conditions such as arthritis, osteoporosis, and Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia.
Still, for the vast majority of us, there’s no reason to sit around waiting for results of the latest research on the exercise-brain connection. Put on your sneakers, hop on your bike, grab your gym bag, or do whatever else it takes to get yourself moving on a regular basis. It will do your entire body good—and that’s a fact.
Visit Dr. Collins’ Blog »

medresearch:

Creative Minds: The Muscle-Brain Connection
Originally posted on the NIH Director’s Blog on September 23, 2014

There’s mounting evidence that exercise has a powerful effect on the human brain. For example, many studies have shown that physical activity appears to reduce the incidence of depression. Exercise can also delay or possibly even prevent Alzheimer’s disease, as well as easing symptoms in people who have these disorders [1, 2, 3, 4, 5]. But how, exactly, does getting our legs moving and our hearts pumping exert a positive influence on our brains?

Two scientists at Stanford University School of Medicine are out to get some answers to this important question. They have proposed that when we exercise, our muscles secrete a factor or combination of factors into the bloodstream, leading to structural and functional changes in the brain.

Winners of a 2013 NIH Director’s Transformative Research Award, Tony Wyss-Coray and Thomas Rando plan to collect all of the molecules that muscles secrete that enable them to communicate with other cells. These molecules include hormones, growth factors, and small proteins called cytokines that are important in cell signaling. The Stanford duo suspects that the key to exercise’s beneficial impact on the brain may lie in its effect on this collection of molecules—which they have dubbed “the communicome.”

To study the communicome, Wyss-Coray and Rando will use a technique called parabiosis to couple the circulatory systems of physically active mice with mice that are less active. If the “couch potato” mice benefit from the blood of the active mice, then the team will analyze the blood to find the responsible factor(s).

This is definitely high-risk high-reward research. It won’t be easy, but finding molecules that mimic exercise’s brain-boosting effects may open the door to new ways of preventing or treating age-related cognitive declines and a wide range of other neurological conditions. This is especially important for people for whom it is difficult or even hazardous to exercise because of conditions such as arthritis, osteoporosis, and Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia.

Still, for the vast majority of us, there’s no reason to sit around waiting for results of the latest research on the exercise-brain connection. Put on your sneakers, hop on your bike, grab your gym bag, or do whatever else it takes to get yourself moving on a regular basis. It will do your entire body good—and that’s a fact.

Visit Dr. Collins’ Blog »

psych-facts

Physical Exercise Can Provide Short-term Mood Enhancement and Alleviate Long-term Depression

psych2go:

image

Physical exercise can help you lose weight and become fit but it has multiple other benefits as well. People generally say that after completing a workout they feel proud, energized and even euphoric. This is because physical exercise has an effect on our mood. It provides short-term mood enhancement as the one described above. In the long run, however, working out can alleviate depression and prevent a relapse into it.

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